Edward Willett

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How I became a DAW author

Here is a tale I’ve told oft before, though never (I think) in print or pixel: the tale of how I became a DAW author. It’s an oft-told tale because I like to share it with writers who are still in that seeking-publication stage, for though the specifics of it are of little use (I doubt any other writer has taken or will take my particular route to a New York publisher), there are some details of it that are, I hope, both helpful and encouraging. Here’s how it transpired... As the new millennium dawned, I had written quite a lot of non-fiction, but only five novels had appeared bearing ...

Posted by Edward Willett at 10:45, December 4th, 2012 under Blog, Books, Writing and Editing | Comment now »

Saturday Special from the Vaults: Sins of the Father

OK, this is an interesting one. As I have often recounted, Marseguro, which won the 2009 Aurora Award for best Canadian science fiction novel in English, began with a single opening line penned as a morning exercise in the Writing With Style program at the Banff Centre, in a science fiction-writing class taught by Robert J. Sawyer (at 9:15 a.m. on September 20, 2005, to be precise--I love computers). That opening was: Emily streaked through the phosphorescent sea, her wake a comet-tail of pale green light, her close-cropped turquoise hair surrounded by a glowing pink aurora. The water racing through her gill-slits smelled of blood. As the week progressed, ...

Posted by Edward Willett at 9:57, January 28th, 2012 under Blog, The Vaults | Comment now »

A nice blog review of Lost in Translation

Mass-market paperbacks have a short shelf life, but that doesn't mean people aren't still reading them long after they're hard to find in a bookstore. Case in point: a nice new review of my first book for DAW, Lost in Translation, just popped up at Scott's Corner, a blog I was hitherto unaware of, but now, of course, can't recommend highly enough! The eponymous Scott has nice things to say: This was a great book, headed by two well drawn characters. The book alternates POV chapters between the two characters. The S’sinn are sufficiently alien, and Kathryn is a great viewpoint character. It's an interesting ...

Posted by Edward Willett at 14:39, May 7th, 2010 under Blog | Comment now »

A new review of Lost in Translation…

...has popped up at the blog Bibliophagic. Brazilian blogger Adiel Mittman gives it four stars out of five (and says it reminded him of Asimov's Foundation series!) but he does have some thoughtful caveats.A few highlights:This book is a good read. The author’s idea of translators is an interesting one...If translating between human languages is not easy, what can be said about translating between languages from different species?...When reading this book, more than once Asimov’s Foundation series came to mind. Asimov created the Mule, a man who had thought-projecting abilities, in order to insert an unpredictable element to stand in the way of the Foundation’s plans, and also described the people from the ...

Posted by Edward Willett at 15:52, December 3rd, 2008 under Blog | Comment now »

A brief Lost in Translation review…

...has showed up in the 50 Book Challenge community on LiveJournal:Alien races have developed biochemical telepathy, but what happens when you try it without the chemical part and the biological part dies? A good premise with some space opera to give the story some meat.As I said a few posts ago, it's nice to see new readers still discovering my first DAW book!

Posted by Edward Willett at 3:20, November 3rd, 2008 under Blog | Comment now »

A new review of Lost in Translation

This review of my first DAW paperback Lost in Translation popped up today at Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books and Music Review:Science Fiction, with telepaths, cool looking cat creatures and the brink of war. How cool is that?...This one snuck up on me. I grabbed it because it looked like a fairly straight forward space yarn. The surprise came with a skillful observation of the possible effects of telepathy. If you can read a mind and that mind can read yours, you know everything they know. Everything they have done and why they did it. With no secrets to hide what’s left? Hatred or love. This story reveals that in the two telepaths from ...

Posted by Edward Willett at 20:29, October 27th, 2008 under Blog | Comment now »

The Query Project

My fellow DAW author Joshua Palmetier has taken it upon himself to coordinate something called The Query Project. He's asked a number of published authors to post, on September 12, one of their actual query letters that led to them getting a publisher or agent, and comment on the art of writing queries in general.I'm happy to take part, and at the end of this post, you'll find a list of all the other authors who are also taking part. I suspect a lot of us will have some of the same things to say, but there may be some surprises in there, too. If you're an aspiring author and agonizing over the writing of a query ...

Posted by Edward Willett at 4:06, September 12th, 2008 under Blog | 4 Comments »

She hates it, she really hates it!

Just to prove I don't only point you to positive reviews of my stuff, here's someone who really, really didn't like Lost in Translation.On the other hand, she did finish it...so I guess I could say she found it "un-put-downable," couldn't I?

Posted by Edward Willett at 15:00, October 11th, 2007 under Blog | 1 Comment »

A few reader comments for Lost in Translation…

...from Paperback Swap:"Great story about two empaths from different species who must work together to find common ground and avert interstellar war. Enjoyed the character development (human and alien).""This book was a very good read for me. The characters were good and well thought out. The author took the homage of walking in another person's shoes to the limit with his ideas of the empathic Translators who quite literally do do it."Of course, since this is from a site called "Paperback Swap" I suspect neither of these readers actually, you know, bought the book, but you can't have everything.

Posted by Edward Willett at 14:51, September 27th, 2007 under Blog | Comment now »

From Babel Fish to Woohoo!

Today's Web column for CBC Saskatchewan's Afternoon Edition...*********If you've ever watched Star Trek, you've heard of the Universal Translator. The Universal Translator is a computer device that is able to instantly translate almost any alien language, no matter how bizarre, into American English.Of course, the Universal Translator doesn't exist...yet. But all over the Web you can find sites that offer you free online translation of selected text or entire Web sites. Do they work? How well do they work?Computer translation is more properly called machine translation, probably because the field is a lot older than you might imagine: in 1954 a successful experiment in machine translation was carried out in which ...

Posted by Edward Willett at 17:38, June 21st, 2007 under Blog | Comment now »