Tag: psychiatry

The aging brain

Despite the fact I am still an astonishingly young man, I do find that I occasionally have more trouble remembering things than I did twenty years ago (when, as a precocious six-year-old, I was news editor of the Weyburn Review). It is, alas, an indisputable fact that our brains change as we age.  However, as …

Continue reading

The changing brain

We’re all getting older. (As the saying goes, it’s better than the alternative.) And as we age, we can’t help noticing that our brains don’t work quite the same way as they did when we were younger. Researchers have certainly noted this, and whether it’s because the average age of the population is going up …

Continue reading

Making miksates…um, mistakes

The holidays are supposed to be a time of rest and relaxation, but if you’re like me, after several nights of parties, you feel pretty much as sleep-deprived as you did before the holidays, if not more so. Also if you’re like me, when you get tired you begin to make more miksates–er, mistakes, ranging …

Continue reading

Dreams: new research

The other night I dreamed I went into a Montreal restaurant with TV chef Emeril, where he annoyed the restaurant’s chef by taking over the cooking of a two-metre-long fish filet, which, when split open, contained a trilobite. “Monster darts!” exclaimed the restaurant’s chef, then demonstrated how to pull the legs off trilobites and throw …

Continue reading

Multitasking

Multitasking–doing several tasks simultaneously–sounds like a time management expert’s dream. What could be more efficient than, say, driving to work while talking to your secretary about the day’s meetings, or writing a report and dictating a letter while also catching the latest stock quotes on TV? There’s just one problem–new studies show multitasking doesn’t work. …

Continue reading

Addiction

We sometimes throw around the word “addiction” a little loosely.  “I’m addicted to Harlequin Romances” someone might say, or, “I’m addicted to CBC Radio.” True addiction, however, isn’t just doing something frequently because you enjoy it, or even a habit that’s hard to break:  it’s a complex condition that involves the brain’s biochemistry, genetic factors, social factors, …

Continue reading

The winter brain

On a cold, dark January day, your brain just slips into neutral. Thoughts crawl along like a snail on sedatives, you can barely remember your own name, and higher functions like mathematics are simply beyond your ability. Right? Not according to a recent study. Apparently, our minds are actually sharper in the winter than in …

Continue reading

Dreams

Dreams have fascinated people for millennia. Ancient people sought portents of the future in dreams. Not-so-ancient people, such as Sigmund Freud, sought information about the psyche: he felt that an examination of dreams could help a psychoanalyst guide a person in the resolution of inner conflicts. In the 20th century, the function of dreams has …

Continue reading

More about memory

A friend recently told me about visiting a family friend’s house as a small child. When they arrived, a huge St. Bernard bounded up to her, put its paws on her shoulders, and pushed her to the ground. She remembers it as though it were yesterday. Her mother and the family friend remember it too–except …

Continue reading

Seasonal affective disorder

Nobody (nobody human, anyway) likes getting up on a cold winter’s day when it’s still dark and the wind is howling, but for some people it’s more than just unpleasant: it’s almost impossible. They suffer from a form of depression called Seasonal Affective Disorder (also known, appropriately, as SAD). Seasonal depression has probably been around …

Continue reading

Easy AdSense Pro by Unreal